Brachiaria Hybrid - Mulato II

B.ruziziensis x B.decumbens x B.brizantha

  • Well-adapted to acid and neutral soils of moderate to low fertility 
  • Tolerates high soil aluminium levels
  • Very persistent, even under seasonally dry conditions
  • Productive, capable of sustaining high stocking rates and grazing pressures
  • High nutritional value for ruminants
  • Maintains green leaf of relatively high nutritional value into seasonally dry periods
  • Responds well to nitrogen fertiliser

    Mulato II is a three-way hybrid (Brachiaria ruziziensis x B. decumbens x B. brizantha). It is the result of three generations of crosses and screening carried out by CIAT’s tropical forages project. Mulato II is the second Brachiaria hybrid developed by CIAT. Being an apomictic hybrid, it is genetically stable and does not segregate or divide from one generation to the next.

     

    • Well-adapted to acid and neutral soils of moderate to low fertility
    • Tolerates high soil aluminium levels
    • Very persistent, even under seasonally dry conditions
    • Productive, capable of sustaining high stocking rates and grazing pressures
    • High nutritional value for ruminants
    • Maintains green leaf of relatively high nutritional value into seasonally dry periods
    • Responds well to nitrogen fertiliser


    Permanent pasture suited to beef and dairy production, particularly when nitrogen-fertilised or grown with well-adapted companion legumes. Suited to hay production.


    Utilization
    Mulato II produces a very high leaf dry matter percentage and has primarily been used for grazing beef cattle. The vigorous and prostrate-type growth during the summer makes rotational grazing recommended for Mulato II pastures. Rotational grazing facilitates the adjustment of optimum stocking rate and control of grazing stubble height. The target stubble height for grazing Mulato II should be 15-25cm. With respect to nutritive value, Mulato II generally has CP of 11-16% and TDN of 55-60%. Although Mulato II has not typically been used as a conserved forage by producers, its vigorous growth and superior nutritive value compared to bahiagrass make it a very attractive option for hay and haylage.


    Sowing/planting rates in mixtures
    8-12 kg/ha for seed or hay production. Likely to be sown as the only grass in a pasture. If companion grasses are used, adjust the sowing rate to total 4 - 6 kg/ha. Do not adjust for legumes.

     

    Sowing time
    To avoid slow establishment associated with cool soils: sow during summer months in the sub-tropics and elevated tropics; spring/summer in tropical coastal areas. Plants will often establish from previously dormant seed over the summer growing period. Drought Tolerance Mulato II has an extensive root system which allows it to tolerate drought and enables it to have rapid regrowth at the onset of the wet season. Its pubescent leaves allow it to efficiently use moisture deposited on the leaves by the evening dew until late the next morning. It is the ability of Mulato II to maintain green leafy dry matter during the dry season (85% leaf ratio) that makes it outstanding dry season forage.

    Specifications
    Tropical Grasses

    Tropical pasture grasses cover a wide range of species. The environments in which they are grown include the wet tropics and the semi-arid tropics. Most of the species are perennials and are characterized by possessing the efficient C4 photosynthesis pathway...