Drilling Radish - Daikon

Raphanus sativus

Daikon Radish has the ability to produce a large taproot and penetrate compacted soil layers in an effort to increases soil aeration, water infiltration, decrease compaction and provide increased rooting depth opportunities to successive crops.

    Daikon Radish has the ability to produce a large taproot and penetrate compacted soil layers in an effort to increases soil aeration, water infiltration, decrease compaction and provide increased rooting depth opportunities to successive crops. These type of tillage roots do their work right where it’s needed – in the soil. They till and aerate to improve soil structure as they grow. When they die, roots add organic matter to the soil in massive amounts, with minimal loss and no digging from us. Considering the cash crop that will be planted next is the first step in developing an effective cover crop management plan. Tillage radish are best suited to proceed summer crops. Ideally the following cash crop will be no-tilled into the terminated tillage radish.

     


    Establishment
    Make sure you clear the area of weeds before soil preparation. A fine seedbed is essential before you broadcast/drill the seeds at a rate of 10kg/ha. Planting depth should not exceed 2cm. Keep moist to help germination. Autumn plantings are recommended for best results.

     


    Utilization
    It breaks through hard, compacted soil layers that have broken many a gardener back. It mechanically opens up channels for water and roots to penetrate. Softening soils is not the only reason to use Daikon as a cover between fall and spring crops. It’s deep roots recycle last year’s nitrogen, catching it before it drains out. Because Daikon decomposes so quickly in areas where it naturally dies, that nitrogen is released for the next season’s use.

     

     

     

    IDEAL IN COVER CROP MIXTURES!

    Specifications
    Herbs & Brassicas

    Forage brassicas are high quality, high yielding, fast growing crops that are particularly suitable for grazing by livestock. Both tops (stems plus leaves) and roots (bulbs) can be grazed and are very nutritious. All members of the brassica family...

    Brassica management
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