Barsweet

Sweet Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare)

  • Sweet sorghum x sweet sorghum hybrid
  • Suitable for grazing and hay making
  • Excellent for silage
  • Leafy with excellent palatability
  • Excellent standover feed for late grazing
  • Sweet sorghum x sweet sorghum hybrid
  • Suitable for grazing and hay making
  • Excellent for silage
  • Leafy with excellent palatability
  • Excellent standover feed for late grazing into autumn and winter
  • Late flowering reduces ergot risk
  • Can be grazed al summer

 

Key Features

  • Genetic Type: Sweet Sorghum by Sweet Sorghum
  • Planting Time: Spring to Summer
  • Soil Temp. at planting: 16°C and rising
  • Early Grazing: Very Good
  • Stand Over: Excellent
  • Hay Making: Good
  • Green Chop: Excellent
  • Silage – Pit: Excellent
  • Silage – Plastic Wrap: Excellent

 

General Comments

  • Best planting time when soil temperatures rises above 16°C
  • Planting dept: 20 – 40mm
  • Roll the area after seeding/planting – this ensures good seed and soil contact
  • Fertilize according to soil analysis
  • First graze/cut when plants reaches a height of 750 – 1000mm
  • Graze down to a height no less than 200-250mm
  • Take Prussic acid precautions when forage sorghums is grazed
  • Forage sorghum is not suitable for horses
Specifications
Sowing rate (marginal dryland)
4 - 7 kg/ha
Sowing rate (good dryland)
8 - 12 kg/ha
Sowing rate (irrigation)
15 - 25 kg/ha
Annual Summer Grass

Cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limit growth during the summer months. Therefore, there is a need for additional grazing, hay or green-chop during midsummer

Cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limit growth during the summer months. Therefore, there is a need for additional grazing, hay or green-chop during midsummer

Cool-season grasses produce ample forage in the spring and fall, but high temperatures and short-term drought stress often limit growth during the summer months. Therefore, there is a need for additional grazing, hay or green-chop during midsummer